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Welcome to My Little Garden
Welcome to My Little Garden

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Tropical Garden, Batu Caves, Malaysia
There is something very serene and stable when I come and spend time in my Garden. These are my quiet moments where I seek God - listening and finding myself in that reflection. There are times when I'm not able to blog, If you have any questions or queries Do seek me out in Facebook and I will try my best to help you out.

Friday, January 8, 2010

Begonia - Curled Leaf Type



Would you agree with me that even a smallest flower can still be beautiful?
I had come across this rare moment when this begonia flower, but often times I'm so busy with my daily routine in fulfilling my work & the time that consume with my family that these little flowers never really got my full attention.

They all in the beginning appear to be little immaculate coins. Once they bloom, they appear to be little fairies. They are quite fragile but the do last for more than few days.

I guess these are my snowdrops & lily of the valley in my garden. I'm still finding this begonia's name - it is still a mystery to me as I find it hard to identify it.
Any help concerning its name will be greatly appreciated.

Another feature of this wonderful begonia is that it has a fine red fur. That really make up that dual colour tone of green & red.

Do click here for my first experience with them in my earlier post:
Curl-leaf Begonia





13 comments:

  1. How wonderful! Those little blooms open up :-D Mine always didn't get to open up. Glad you did a close-up. Nice pictures James!

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  2. Yes, I do agree that even the tiniest flowers can be beautiful! I've always loved the sweet little flowers on begonias.

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  3. Hello James,

    I think the smallest parts of plants can be beautiful. I love the leaves and flowers of the Begonia.

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  4. Wonderful little begonia. I have masses of different types, except for the tuberous ones. I particularly love cane begonias. We have a nursery nearby that specializes in begonias that may help you identify it. Here's the link: http://www.members.tripod.com/palmhammockorchidest/master.html

    If you do identify it, let us all know.

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  5. Good things do come in small packages!
    They are stunning, James!
    Rosey

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  6. interesting that you can see that fine red fur - I had never noticed that in a begonia.

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  7. The leaves look feathery and juicy. The tiny flowers are lovely. These are certainly delicate beauties.

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  8. Stephanie - I guess you also have the same plant in your garden. I would like to suggest to take some cuttings and plant them on the ground.
    I had found that these seemed to be healthier and blooms well compared to those on hanging pots.

    Penny - not all begonias do well in my garden, those which are the floral types just don't seem to thrive. Had hard times with rex begonias.I have one cane begonia and its growing taller by the months.
    Thanks for your comment & the link - will check that out.

    Thank you Floridagirl, Noelle, Rosey, Wendy & Belle for your lovely comments. Appreciate it very much.

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  9. James, how lucky you are to be in the perfect environment for growing Begonias, your collection looks beautiful (as seen in earlier postings).
    I grow only one B. sutherlandii, I love it.

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  10. I enjoy reading this post on that wee flower, the begonia. Thanks

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  11. Never put off till tomorrow what may be done today..........................

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  12. Thanks Barry - enjoy looking at your garden too. Hope you had an enjoyable time in the beach & orchard.

    Paterika - Thanks for visiting. I enjoy your blog of poems too. Nice of you to have both nature & poems together.

    Fast - thanks for dropping by & your comment.

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  13. James I was just looking at the Phillips and Rix "Indoor and Greenhouse Plants" and found this about Rex Begonias: "The original species Begonia was introduced in Europe from Assam in 1858. Its leaves are heart-shaped, blue green with a silvery-white zone near the margin. This was soon crossed with other rhizomatous species to form the beginning of the present race; red hairy forms such as 'Fireflush' appeared with the introduction of B. decora from Penang in around 1895"
    All this to say that your Begonia sounds like it may be B. decora as it is native to your region.

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